HPG Policy Briefs

Overview

Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) Policy Briefs are short papers which contain key points and policy recommendations. Some complement or summarise our reports, while others combine analysis from previous research with consultation around a live policy issue or crisis situation.

Language: 
English
Humanitarian Policy Group
Publications in this series
Humanitarian history in a complex world

Humanitarian history in a complex world

HPG Policy Briefs, 59, May 2014
Eleanor Davey
What can we learn from the past? This HPG Policy brief explores how an understanding of humanitarian history can bring valuable skills, resources and insights to humanitarian practice and policy and help analysis of complex situations and crises.
The interaction between humanitarian and military actors: where do we go from here?

The interaction between humanitarian and military actors: where do we go from here?

HPG Policy Briefs, 58, April 2014
Increased engagement by the military in humanitarian crises, often led by the push for stabilisation, has been controversial, but effective civil–military coordination can help save lives and alleviate suffering in emergencies. This policy brief looks at some of the key civil-military challenges and suggests concrete ways forward to achieve effective cooperation between civilian and military groups.
Addressing protection needs in Syria: overlooked, difficult, impossible?

Addressing protection needs in Syria: overlooked, difficult, impossible?

HPG Policy Briefs, 57, April 2014
In the last three years, the conflict in Syria has claimed over 120,000 lives. Despite policy developments on protection of civilians, people on the ground continue to bear the brunt of the crisis. Why has the international humanitarian community’s response to Syria focused on access, not protection – and what other alternatives exist for people seeking to survive in Syria?
Protecting civilians: the gap between norms and practice

Protecting civilians: the gap between norms and practice

HPG Policy Briefs, 56, April 2014
Ashley Jackson
Attacks on civilians have become an all too commonplace occurrence in conflicts, illustrated vividly in crises in Syria and the Central African Republic. Yet at the same time there has been a range of developments in laws and policies focused on improving the protection of civilians (PoC) in armed conflicts since the 1990s. This policy brief examines the gap between the reality for civilians on the ground and PoC norms and policies and suggests areas for further work to help translate rhetoric into reality.

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