Global Financial Crisis Phase 2 Monitoring Country Case Studies

7 September 2009 08:00 - 16:00 GMT+00
Workshop

Chair:

Dirk Willem te Velde - ODI

Speakers:

Prof L Alan Winters - DFID 

Sven Olander - SIDA

Professor Mustafiz Rahman - Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Dr Hossein Jalilian - Cambodia Development Resource Institute (CDRI), Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Luis Carlos Jemio - Institute for Advanced Development Studies (INESAD), La Paz, Bolivia

Dr Sarah Ssewanyana - Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC), Kampala, Uganda
Dr H.Bohela Lunogelo - Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania
Dr Getnet Alemu - College of Development Studies, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Dr Danny Cassimon - University of Antwerp, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
Professor Medani Ahmed - University of Khartoum, Sudan
Professor Carlos Castel-Branco - Institute for Social and Economic Studies (IESE), Maputo,
Mozambique


Description

A team of 40 researchers from ODI and 10 developing countries embarked upon a unique monitoring study looking into the effects of the global financial crisis from January-March 2009. It found that some effects had already become visible when the G-20 leaders met in London on 2 April 2009, but worse was likely to come. With current forecasts of the state of the world economy varying widely from green shoots, to double dips, to a long and deep recession, and ahead of the G-20 meeting in Pittsburgh on 24-25 September 2009, where the position of low income countries should be considered, this workshop marked the start of the a second phase of the monitoring study (deepening selected phase 1 studies and covering other countries), and considered the effects of the global slowdown on 11 low income countries. The workshop aimed to obtain initial information for the G-20 meeting, informing the development responses of countries such as Sweden (the current president of the EU), while also clarifying a path forward until December 2009.

We are grateful for funding from UK DFID and Swedish SIDA.