Social effects of economic and climate crises

To promote progress towards sustainable development, poverty reduction strategies must address social exclusion and recognise the many dimensions of poverty.
Syrian refugees and Lebanese women learn how to make fishing nets in order to help them find work. Photo: Russell Watkins/DFID, Lebanon 2013

The social exclusion of groups already at greater risk of the impact of economic and climate crises only reinforces poverty and inequality.

These groups include women and girls, children and young people, older people, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and migrants.

Such crises are likely to have a long-lasting impact on their lives. The barriers they face in accessing basic services, social networks, livelihood opportunities and the benefits of trade and growth can undermine the impact and reach of poverty reduction frameworks and strategies.

Our work facilitates the development of gender-sensitive and inclusive poverty reduction strategies to target the most vulnerable and marginalised groups in society. We also look at effective resilience and adaptation mechanisms and explore the impact of crises and shocks, both financial and climate-related, through an age and gender lens.