Men and intimate partner violence: from research to action in Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan

Research reports and studies
March 2017
Fiona Samuels, Nicola Jones and Taveeshi Gupta
A man and a boy lean over a table to draw on paper

This report details research exploring the underlying drivers, triggers, risks and influencing factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) in South Asia. It contains a full account of primary research undertaken in three South Asian countries with high levels of IPV: Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.

While there is considerable evidence from the perspective of IPV survivors, relatively little is known about what drives men and boys’ attitudes and perpetration of IPV, and therefore what are the most appropriate programme and policy responses. This work attempts to fill some of these knowledge gaps by exploring three key questions:

  1. To what extent do social norms drive male perpetration of IPV in South Asia?
  2. In what ways do broader political economic dynamics shape attitudes, behaviours and service provision regarding IPV?
  3. What are the entry points for policy and programming to tackle male perpetration of IPV?

Individual country reports investigating the multi-level factors that act as drivers and triggers of IPV are available on the project page.

A short version of this report synthesises the key findings while stressing the importance of engaging with men and boys in efforts to tackle IPV, particularly given a backlash that appears to be growing as women become more empowered in the region.