Tanzania national climate change finance analysis

Research reports and studies
September 2013
Pius Yanda, Deograsias Mushi, Abdallah Issa Henku, Faustin Maganga, Honesty Minde, Nico Malik, Adolphine Kateka, Neil Bird and Helen Tilley
The study focuses on climate change relevant expenditures that appear in the national budget of Tanzania over the period 2009/10 – 2012/13. The study reviews public spending on activities that are related to climate change, and assesses the extent to which this expenditure responds to existing policy and institutional demands.  The following key messages are made:

  • Climate change relevant expenditure has increased steadily as a proportion of the total budget from 4.2 per cent in 2009/10 to 6.5 per cent in 2012/13.  This growth in budget for climate change relevant activities has been driven by an increase in donor funding that is on-budget.
  • The 2012 National Climate Change Strategy represents a significant milestone, but it needs to be further strengthened to include: (i) the identification of priority programmes; (ii) their budgeted costs; and (iii) the expected sources of funding.
  • The financing of climate change actions appears to be treated primarily as a budgetary rather than a policy issue.
  • The composition of climate change relevant expenditure appears to have shifted over the four year period, from projects with a primary focus on either adaptation or mitigation, to projects that appear to combine both objectives.
  • There is a considerable amount of spending taking place in ministries without the full realisation of the significance of such spending in terms of its relation to climate change.